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Converting a Logan 11" x 32" Lathe over to full CNC, Part 20:

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

With the encoder itself mounted, all that was left was to wire it. I used a standard solder-in DB9
plug kit from eBay (since there aren't any Radio Shacks left) and got it properly connected.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

Assemble the plug body, and that's it.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

For a quick bench test, I wired up the board and power supply, plugged in the
encoder, and booted up the PC. Spinning the encoder shaft by hand
showed a positive spindle reading on the screen, so she checks out.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

Now it's finally time to wire this whole mess up properly. I don't yet have a
decent enclosure I like, and I'm not sure how I'd want to lay things out
anyway, so for the time being, for a very rough prototype stage, I
screwed the modules to a piece of plywood.
The top two boxes are Leadshine stepper drivers,
the green board is the Centroid Acorn,
the leftward silver box is the stepper power supply,
the middle silver box is the Acorn power supply,
and the small box is the driver power supply.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

Following the instructions supplied with the Acorn, and the diagrams from the drivers,
it was a relatively easy job to connect power and step/direction signals.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

Once I had it mostly wired, I screwed it to the wall behind the Logan,
and connected the encoder, ethernet cable, both stepper motors, two
as-yet-unmounted limit switches, and a makeshift E-stop button,
unceremoniously- and temporarily- taped
to the top of the lathe control box. :)

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

After a second look at the how-to videos, I powered up the new system, booted up the PC, gave the
various parameters a quick configuration (most of which was done for me, as the computer came pre-
configured and pre-loaded with CNC12 Lathe) then, after a few hiccups, was able to launch the CNC
program. Unfortunately, one of my brand-new Leadshine stepper drivers turned out to be effectively
DOA- it would power up, and give me a green light, but would not move the motor.

I eventually tried three different steppers, and on both channels (X and Z) from the Acorn, but
it never worked. I have another on the way and the old one in the return mail.

On the positive side, the spindle encoder, as you can see here, works perfectly,
and agrees precisely with my non-contact laser tachometer.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

Since I needed at least one new driver anyway, I splurged a bit and upgraded to
Automation Technologies closed-loop 'hybrid' steppers, which came with their
own dedicated drivers. It took a minute to figure out the wiring, and extend the
absurdly short 18" power cables supplied with the motors (the encoder cable
comes with an extension) but eventually everything plugged right in and
powered up just fine.

Logan Lathe CNC Conversion

The motors are 3-pole 282 oz-in steppers with an attached 1000-line (4K pulse) encoder. As they're a
NEMA-23 frame just like the 270 oz-in steppers I took off, they bolted right into place with no fuss.

Once everything was in place and wired, I booted up CNC12 and tried the manual jog. The new motors
worked perfectly, a bit quieter than the old steppers, and sounded a bit smoother. One axis was working
"backwards", but that was an easy fix. I could have flipped it in the CNC12 "Wizard", but the drivers have
a DIP switch on the side- just flick that and the directions are reversed.

Now that that's sorted, it's time to watch the setting up video again, and do a little fine tuning.


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